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SAMPLE COURSE MATERIAL

Cyberbullying is defined as harassing, threatening, intimidating, and/or humiliating another person through technology such as social media platforms (ex. Facebook,
Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram) and mobile devices, according to Kids Health. Cyberbullying is evident in several various forms, and as technology advances, so will the methods by which cyberbullies harass and/or humiliate their victims. Dr. Christine MacDonald emphasized in her interview with OnlineMSWPrograms.com:
“The platforms are constantly changing, as new apps and social media sites are developed and older means of communication, such as email, begin to be perceived as out-of-date. Whatever the platforms that children and adolescents are primarily using will be what cyberbullies will be drawn to as well. Recently, it appears that young people are moving away from Facebook to some degree, and towards Snapchat, Instagram, Vine, and Twitter.”

Dr. Jonathan Singer, LCSW, explained in an interview with Online MSWPrograms.com that some of the primary forms of cyberbullying include:

• Denigration: Publicly posting insulting and harmful statements about another person online, using one’s own social media account(s). Examples of denigration include commenting negatively about a peer’s weight using one’s Facebook or Twitter account or making fun of someone publicly online for an embarrassing situation.
• Impersonation: Hacking into another person’s account and posting offensive, embarrassing, or insulting content. Impersonation can also involve someone taking over another person’s account and using it to cyberbully other individuals.
• Flaming: Engaging in an online fight over social media. This type of cyberbullying often involves denigration
• Outing/Trickery: Obtaining and then disclosing confidential information about an individual in order to humiliate them. Examples of outing or trickery include publicizing someone’s sexual orientation without their consent or posting comments about a person’s private anxieties or fears.
• Cyberstalking: Repeatedly sending humiliating, intimidating, threatening, or otherwise cruel messages to someone else online or through text.

In some cases, the cyberbully may be anonymous, while in other instances the victim and bully may be acquaintances or former friends.

SAMPLE POST TEST

1. Cyberbullying can be evident in the following forms:

  • Denigration
  • Impersonation
  • Cyberstalking
  • All of the above

2. Denigration is defined as repeatedly sending humiliating, intimidating, threatening, or otherwise cruel messages to someone else online or through text.

  • True
  • False

3. The key elements of cyberbullying include the following, except:

  • Lack of intention to harm
  • Repetition
  • An attempt to have power over another individual through intimidation
  • Direct intention of harm

Cyberbullying: Understanding it, How to Prevent It: A Tool for Social Workers, Mental Health Professionals, School Personnel, & Parents

CE Hours: 4
Instructor: Melissa M. Hensel, LCSW

Course Description:

This 4 CE home study course discusses what social workers and other mental health professionals should know about cyberbullying. It addresses the psychological, emotional and social effects of cyberbullying and how social workers can address it in school and community settings. It also helps mental health professions with educating parents and school personnel on ways to prevent and respond to cyberbullying.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the definition of cyberbullying.
  • Describe the impact of cyberbullying.
  • Explain the key elements of cyberbullying.
  • Describe the effective strategies for social workers and other mental health professionals can implement to help kids cope with cyberbulying.

 

Section 1Free Preview
Lecture 1Free PreviewFree Preview

SAMPLE COURSE MATERIAL

Cyberbullying is defined as harassing, threatening, intimidating, and/or humiliating another person through technology such as social media platforms (ex. Facebook,
Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram) and mobile devices, according to Kids Health. Cyberbullying is evident in several various forms, and as technology advances, so will the methods by which cyberbullies harass and/or humiliate their victims. Dr. Christine MacDonald emphasized in her interview with OnlineMSWPrograms.com:
“The platforms are constantly changing, as new apps and social media sites are developed and older means of communication, such as email, begin to be perceived as out-of-date. Whatever the platforms that children and adolescents are primarily using will be what cyberbullies will be drawn to as well. Recently, it appears that young people are moving away from Facebook to some degree, and towards Snapchat, Instagram, Vine, and Twitter.”

Dr. Jonathan Singer, LCSW, explained in an interview with Online MSWPrograms.com that some of the primary forms of cyberbullying include:

• Denigration: Publicly posting insulting and harmful statements about another person online, using one’s own social media account(s). Examples of denigration include commenting negatively about a peer’s weight using one’s Facebook or Twitter account or making fun of someone publicly online for an embarrassing situation.
• Impersonation: Hacking into another person’s account and posting offensive, embarrassing, or insulting content. Impersonation can also involve someone taking over another person’s account and using it to cyberbully other individuals.
• Flaming: Engaging in an online fight over social media. This type of cyberbullying often involves denigration
• Outing/Trickery: Obtaining and then disclosing confidential information about an individual in order to humiliate them. Examples of outing or trickery include publicizing someone’s sexual orientation without their consent or posting comments about a person’s private anxieties or fears.
• Cyberstalking: Repeatedly sending humiliating, intimidating, threatening, or otherwise cruel messages to someone else online or through text.

In some cases, the cyberbully may be anonymous, while in other instances the victim and bully may be acquaintances or former friends.

SAMPLE POST TEST

1. Cyberbullying can be evident in the following forms:

  • Denigration
  • Impersonation
  • Cyberstalking
  • All of the above

2. Denigration is defined as repeatedly sending humiliating, intimidating, threatening, or otherwise cruel messages to someone else online or through text.

  • True
  • False

3. The key elements of cyberbullying include the following, except:

  • Lack of intention to harm
  • Repetition
  • An attempt to have power over another individual through intimidation
  • Direct intention of harm
Section Quiz
Section 2
Final Quiz